Why And How To Close The Gender Gap In The Life Sciences

Why And How To Close The Gender Gap In The Life Sciences

Statistics on leadership in the life sciences industry indicate a disturbing trend for women. They enter the industry in equal proportion to men but account for just 24 percent of C-suite positions and about 14 percent of board-level positions. That’s according to a 2017 report by The Massachusetts Biotechnology Council (MassBio), based on surveys of 850 professionals and 70 companies within the state. Similarly, Women in the Workplace 2017, a national report based on surveys of more than 70,000 employees and 222 companies by McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.org, found 52 percent of entry-level positions at pharmaceutical and medical products companies are filled by women, and 22 percent of C-suite positions are filled by them. The MassBio report says the number for biotech boards is probably closer to 10 percent. GSK’s Emma Walmsley made headlines in 2017 when she was named Big Pharma’s first female CEO – and was given a pay package worth 25 percent less than her predecessor’s.

What’s next for pharma innovation in China

What’s next for pharma innovation in China

Three prominent Chinese executives discuss the progress of local companies in drug innovation and the evolving regulatory environment.

China has stepped up investment in drug innovation in recent years, both in basic research and in industry research and development. China’s pharmaceutical market is the second largest worldwide, after that of the United States, reaching $115 billion in sales in 2015. Further growth is on the way. China faces mounting medical needs—for example, it has 114 million diabetic patients and more than 700,000 new cases of lung cancer diagnosed each year. At the same time, the ongoing reform of the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) aims to accelerate the pace of pharmaceutical development in the country.

Asia on the move: Five trends shaping the Asia biopharmaceutical market

Asia on the move: Five trends shaping the Asia biopharmaceutical market

Enthusiasm for the biopharmaceutical sector in Asia has been flat, due in part to China’s market-access blockade, Japan’s spending controls, and deceleration in India and Southeast Asia. Recent changes have reignited interest in the region, with important implications for pharma executives.

CANbridge Life Sciences Appoints Chief Medical Officer

CANbridge Life Sciences Appoints Chief Medical Officer

ANbridge Life Sciences, a biopharmaceutical company developing Western drug candidates in China and North Asia, announced that it strengthened the executive management team with the appointment of May Orfali, MD, as Chief Medical Officer, on July 23, 2018. Dr. Orfali replaced Dr. Mark Goldberg, who was acting as interim Chief Medical Officer. 

Taiwan: The Clinical Trials Gateway to China?

Taiwan: The Clinical Trials Gateway to China?

Taiwan sits, along with its smaller counterparts, Singapore and Hong Kong, as one of the gateway countries to running a clinical trial in China. Although Hong Kong’s regulatory ties are more formalized with China, than Taiwan, Taiwan has the right environment and population to make the possibility of greater regulatory cohesion with its giant neighbour, not such a distant possibility, representing a huge opportunity for sponsors looking to break into the China market at some point.

Protecting the accuracy of clinical trial data in China

Protecting the accuracy of clinical trial data in China

The Chinese government has signalled its commitment to ensuring the quality of clinical trials conducted in China. In 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) announced a plan to protect data integrity, requesting that trial applicants inspect their own data. The government also initiated inspections of research data by CFDA officials. This plan was not only limited to self-inspection by researchers. Instead, it provides a chance for researchers to withdraw applications to the CFDA without further punishment, or a time window in which to make amendments to the quality of the data.

How Hospitals Are Using Patient-Reported Outcomes to Improve Care

How Hospitals Are Using Patient-Reported Outcomes to Improve Care

Increasingly, physicians’ every action and outcome is measured and reported. The data-gathering process can be frustrating, and many clinicians are growing skeptical of its clinical value. For them, outcomes measurement may seem like just another reimbursement requirement or process compliance task. However, measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) — patients’ own accounting of their symptoms, functional status, and quality of life — can and should be a clinical tool.

Talent Management and the Dual-Career Couple

Talent Management and the Dual-Career Couple

As the head of a large manufacturing plant at a multinational conglomerate, an executive I’ll call David had proved himself a competent, trustworthy manager. So when the presidency of one of the company’s key businesses unexpectedly became vacant, the CEO sat David down to share the good news that he had been chosen for the role....

A Data-Driven Approach to Identifying Future Leaders

A Data-Driven Approach to Identifying Future Leaders

Having a strong pool of talent is critical for success in today’s business environment. After all, weak leadership can be one of the biggest impediments companies face. Diversity in leadership is a potential key to unlocking high performance within organizations. However, despite significant attention and investment, the top management of the largest U.S. corporations remains not very diverse.

Rethinking the East Asian Leadership Gap

Rethinking the East Asian Leadership Gap

The difficulty Western companies have identifying managers with leadership potential in East Asia says more about prevailing Western views of leadership than it does about available talent.

Many western multinational corporations (MNCs) operating in East and Southeast Asia bemoan the lack of local leadership talent. Several recent surveys have pointed to the scarcity of regional talent as a growth limiting factor in the Far East. But fast emerging MNCs in Indonesia, South Korea, and Malaysia, as well as companies in China and Japan, don’t seem to have as much trouble finding or growing Asian leaders.

Why GE, Boeing, Lowe's and Walmart Are Directly Buying Health Care for Employees

Why GE, Boeing, Lowe's and Walmart Are Directly Buying Health Care for Employees

Bundled payments in health care have gained favor because they can reduce costs and help improve outcomes. In essence, episodic bundles cover the cost of a patient’s care from start to finish—all the procedures, devices, tests, drugs and services a patient will need for, say, a knee replacement or back surgery.

While Medicare has led the development of bundles in the U.S., large employers are now directly purchasing bundled care for their employees through selected providers.

Is R&D Getting Harder, or Are Companies Just Getting Worse At It?

Is R&D Getting Harder, or Are Companies Just Getting Worse At It?

We know innovation drives corporate growth. As Strategy& reported in its 2015 survey of 1,757 executives, “innovation today is a key driver of organic growth for all companies — regardless of sector or geography.” According to that report, the top 1,000 R&D spenders invested $680 billion in R&D that year, up 5% from the prior year. Historically, R&D has been viewed as the engine of national economic growth as well.

So why is R&D producing a worse ROI than ever?

How Leaders Can Push Employees Without Stressing Them Out

How Leaders Can Push Employees Without Stressing Them Out

One of the most interesting findings of a recent HBR article on team chemistry is that the types of people who become leaders within organizations are about 30% less likely than their coworkers to feel stressed out. As the CEO of a small investment firm, I was surprised by the finding, but as I considered my own leadership style and intraoffice relationships, I concluded that the authors were onto something. Plus, a finding from a 20,000-person survey is probably worth paying attention to....

The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent

The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent

The general view in business is that top-end talent is highly sensitive to and motivated by compensation and that big monetary rewards are key to their management. There is a grain of truth to this — but only a grain. In my 36-year career, I haven’t met a single person truly at the top end of the talent distribution who is highly motivated by compensation. Not one.

4 Things That Set Successful CEO's Apart?

4 Things That Set Successful CEO's Apart?

The chief executive role is a tough one to fill. From 2000 to 2013, about a quarter of the CEO departures in the Fortune500 were involuntary, according to the Conference Board. The fallout from these dismissals can be staggering: Forced turnover at the top costs shareholders an estimated $112 billion in lost market value annually, a 2014 PwC studyof the world’s 2,500 largest companies showed. Those figures are discouraging for directors who have the hard task of anointing CEOs—and daunting to any leader aspiring to the C-suite. Clearly, many otherwise capable leaders and boards are getting something wrong. The question is, what?

Amgen Vs. Sandoz. How Will This Shape the Biosimilar Sector?

Amgen Vs. Sandoz. How Will This Shape the Biosimilar Sector?

These are formative days for biosimilar developers in the U.S. courts. Last month, the biosimilar market witnessed its first legal settlement, between Mylan and Genentech for trastuzumab, and further settlements are sure to follow. On April 26, the Supreme Court began hearing the case between Amgen and Sandoz regarding the infamous “patent dance.” The Court’s ruling (expected in July) will have significant ramifications on how quickly new biosimilars reach the market......

Neurodiversity as a Competitive Advantage

Neurodiversity as a Competitive Advantage

Meet John. He’s a wizard at data analytics. His combination of mathematical ability and software development skill is highly unusual. His CV features two master’s degrees, both with honors. An obvious guy for a tech company to scoop up, right?

Until recently, no. Before John ran across a firm that had begun experimenting with alternative approaches to talent, he was unemployed for more than two years. Other companies he had talked with badly needed the skills he possessed. But he couldn’t make it through the hiring process.

If you watched John for a while, you’d start to see why. He seems, well, different......